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Israeli researchers develop viruses that kill bowel-harming germs as a precise weapon

Two distinct virus "cocktails" have been the subject of phase 1 clinical investigations; preliminary results indicate that they are safe, and extensive in vitro and animal testing indicates that they are antibacterial.

The notion of Phage therapy, also known as Bacteriophage therapy, is not new and was the focus of intensive study in the early 20th century. Researchers continued to use phages in experimental settings despite the development of antibiotics and the largely unsuccessful attempts to use viruses in clinical settings.

The virus greatly reduced the number of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacterium that is common in the stomachs of people with Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis, according to peer-reviewed study that was released in the journal Cell.

Researchers continued to use phages in experimental settings despite the development of antibiotics and the largely unsuccessful attempts to use viruses in clinical settings. Concerns over bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics have recently sparked a rise in interest in possible phage treatments.

The phages will now undergo more medical trials to see if they can combat bacteria and enhance health in a real-world setting.

The Weizmann Institute researchers hope to develop them into drugs that also treat Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis or perhaps even shield patients with high Klebsiella pneumonia levels from developing the conditions in the first place.

Israeli researchers develop viruses that kill bowel-harming germs as a precise weapon

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